Oct 24, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology

  
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    BIOL 426 - Approaches to Molecular Biology

    (4.00)
    This course will analyze, with class discussions and reading of scientific literature, the various methods used to study the molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. It will include such topics as restriction mapping, DNA sequencing,cloning strategies and vectors, library construction and screening, probing the sequence organization of DNA and genes, and other current topics relevant to the regulation of the expression of genetic information.

    Course ID: 52533
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 428 - Computer Applications in Molecular Biology

    (4.00)
    This course is designed as an introduction for biology and biochemistry students to the use of applications software in the analysis of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data. Topics will include operating systems; telecommunications with off campus database; and specific software packages for general and analytical treatment of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data. Some elementary programming will be included.

    Course ID: 52535
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 430 - Biological Chemistry

    (4.00)
    An introductory course describing the essential principles of biochemistry. Topics include the structure and characterization of biological macromolecules, the energetics and thermodynamics of coupled biological reactions, and enzymology. The most important metabolic pathways are described, emphasizing their cellular compartmentalization, integration and control. 

    Course ID: 52536
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 303   and CHEM 351   with a grade of 'C" or better.
  
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    BIOL 434 - Microbial Molecular Genetics

    (4.00)
    The approaches of microbial genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry are combined for the study of the molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression in bacteria. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of research literature.

    Course ID: 52539
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  and CHEM 351  with a grade of C or better.
  
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    BIOL 442 - Developmental Biology

    (3.00)
    A lecture course that considers the two major aspects of animal development: the means by which, starting with a fertilized egg, progeny cells progressively differentiate from their precursors and one another to produce the ultimate diversity of the multicellular organism; and the processes by which this increasingly complex population of cells is synthesized into a single integrated organism.

    Course ID: 52544
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 443 - Advanced Topics in Developmental Biology

    (8.00)
    Designed to emphasize cellular, molecular and biochemical aspects of basic developmental questions, this course introduces the student to modern approaches to determination, differentiation and morpho-genesis. Experimental design and analysis of data are emphasized. Possible topics include molecular and cellular aspects of gametogenesis, fertilization, embryogenesis and continuous development in the adult; mechanisms of intra- and intercellular communication; and pattern formation and positional information. Developmental model systems using unicellular organisms are considered. The course is repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits or 2 attempts  if different topics are covered.

    Course ID: 52545
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive (GEP)
    Requirement Group:You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303   and BIOL 442   and ENGL 100   with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 444 - Development and Cancer

    (4.00)
    This course will explore at the molecular level the interface between animal development and cancer. Through a combination of didactic lectures, reading of the primary scientific literature, and in-class presentations students will explore the latest advances in understanding how the processes that govern normal cell growth and differentiation become altered in cancer. Topics will include signaling mechanisms, stem cell biology, and cell cycle control.

    Course ID: 52546
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 445 - Signal Transduction

    (4.00)
    This course will examine some of the methods by which the reception of signals from the environment leads to the changes in gene and protein activity in responding cells that constitute a biological response. Signal transduction in the context of developmental biology and neurobiology will be the main area of study. Six to eight topics will be emphasized through critical reading, analysis and presentation of original articles from primary literature. The use of genetic, molecular and biochemical techniques to address questions in the field of signal transduction will be examined.

    Course ID: 52547
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 451 - Neurobiology

    (4.00)
    Covers nervous system function at the cellular level, ionic mechanisms underlying electrical activity in nerve cells, the physiology of synapses, transduction and integration of sensory information, activity in populations of neurons, the specification of neuronal connections, and trophic and plastic properties of nerve cells.  Note:This course is Writing Intensive.

    Course ID: 52548
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302   and BIOL 303   and either BIOL 305   or BIOL 307  and ENGL 100  or equivalent with a grade of C or better.
  
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    BIOL 453 - Physiological Bases of Behavior

    (4.00)
    Studies of important adaptive behavioral patterns and their physiological bases. The course begins with some basic principles of the study of animal behavior followed by special topics such as sexual behavior, feeding, communication, prey capture, and predator evasion.  Note:This course is Writing Intensive.

    Course ID: 52550
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302   and BIOL 303   and either  BIOL 305  or BIOL 307   and ENGL 100  or equivalent with a grade of C or better.
  
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    BIOL 454 - Vision Science

    (4.00)
    This course will focus in depth on visual systems of animals and humans. Coverage will span the range of modern research from the biochemistry and physiology of the photoreceptors to the ecology, evolution and functional optimization of visual systems. Topics include visual pigments, biochemical basis of phototransduction, visual processing and organization of visual centers of the brain, eyes, optical arrays, visual evolution and ecology. NOTE:This course is Writing Intensive.

    Course ID: 52551
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 302   and BIOL 303   and either BIOL 305  or BIOL 307   and ENGL 100  or equivalent with a C or better.
  
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    BIOL 456 - Plant Molecular Biology

    (4.00)
    This course is focused on exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying plant physiology and development and is designed to foster interactive learning. The course begins with a brief review of some important principles and techniques in Molecular Biology and Genetics. A session focusing on familiarizing students with multiple bioinformatics tools via a comprehensive group project is followed. Then the course pursues in depth several topics, such as meristems, flower and embryo development, the circadian clock, signal transduction of environmental cues, hormonal regulation of gene expression and development, host-pathogen interactions, applications of genetic engineering, and other current/hot topics. Molecular genetic approaches using model plant systems are stressed throughout the course. Note:This course is Writing Intensive.

    Course ID: 52553
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302   and BIOL 303   and  ENGL 100  or equivalent all with a C or better.
  
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    BIOL 457 - Physiology of Marine and Estuarine Animals.

    (4.00)
    A study of the physiological specializations demanded by marine/estuarine environments, including physiological mechanisms for coping with stresses imposed by extremes of temperature, salinity, aerial exposure and low oxygen concentrations; sensory physiology, including visual, chemical and mechanical modalities; exogenous and endogenous rhythms related to tidal or diel cycles; and bioluminescence. The course includes one or more trips to field laboratories.

    Course ID: 52554
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  and [BIOL 305   or BIOL 307  ] with a grade of "C" or better
  
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    BIOL 463 - Theoretical and Quantitative Biology

    (4.00)
    A course in probability and advanced biostatistics. Topics will include the elementary mathematical techniques used in biology and medicine, the relationships among probability distributions used in standard statistical tests, univariate linear and nonlinear analysis, correlation matrices, multivariate analysis and path analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant and principal component analysis. Students will present examples of the analysis from the literature. The class will solve problems, and each student will analyze a set of experimental data.

    Course ID: 52558
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Laboratory, Lecture
    Requirement Group:You must have completed BIOL 142   and BIOL 302  and BIOL 303   and STAT 350   or STAT 355   all with a grade of 'C' or better. 
  
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    BIOL 466 - Population and Conservation Genetics

    (4.00)


    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the fields of population and conservation genetics. Principles of population genetics are needed to understand evolution, epidemiology, and conservation biology. Forces and processes involved in shaping genetic variation, methods of measuring genetic variation and structure in natural populations, as well as strategies for worldwide conservation of endangered species will be emphasized. The course is a hybrid course and consists of lecture, primary literature discussions, and experimental computer simulations for analyzing or modeling population genetic data.

                

    Course ID: 52561
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 142  and BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  and STAT 350   or STAT 355   all with a C or better.

  
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    BIOL 468 - Ecology of Rivers and Streams

    (4.00)
    This course provides an understanding of the structure and functions of lotic ecosystems and how these systems operate in terms of energetics, interactions among component species, and the physical and chemical properties of undisturbed and disturbed watersheds. Special attention will be given to the relationships between biodiversity, species substitutability and ecosystem processing as they relate to the conservation and protection of rivers, streams and non-tidal wetlands.

    Course ID: 52563
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group:You must have completed BIOL 142   and BIOL 302   and BIOL 303  and CHEM 102   with a grade of C or better.
  
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    BIOL 470 - General Virology

    (4.00)
    This course is a comprehensive overview of virology, with an emphasis on animal viruses. Topics include the physical and chemical nature of viruses, techniques used to study viruses in the laboratory, virus replication and genetics, virus-host interactions, and antiviral strategies. 

    Course ID: 52564
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 476 - Antibotics: Origin, Mechanism, Resistance

    (4.00)
    Infectious agents, the bacteria and viruses, accounted for 57 percent of the deaths in the U.S. in 1900 and less than 4 percent in 1990. The discovery and application of antibiotics and other chemotherapeutic agents are largely responsible for this dramatic reversal. In this course the origin of selected chemotherapeutic agents, their detailed mode of action and the basis for emergence of resistant microbial populations will be discussed. Similarly, the action of selected drugs used in chemotherapy, which attempts to control cancer cell growth, will be outlined. The principle of rational drug design and radical "new" methods of attacking microbial populations will be explored.

    Course ID: 52566
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  and CHEM 351  with a grade of C or better.
  
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    BIOL 477 - Applications of Biodetection Approaches

    (4.00)
    The ability to detect and identify genetic and protein markers forms a common theme for many different fields of biological sciences including medical diagnostics, environmental microbiology, food/water safety, biodefense/homeland security, and veterinary science. Because of its central role throughout a diverse set of biological disciplines the methods and approaches for biodetection are extremely varied and wide-ranging. This course begins with basic detection approaches and continues with examples of principles guiding biodetection by relating each approach to important present-day challenges facing society. The course will also include an indepth analysis of biological principles guiding detection strategies to understand not only the potential but also the limitations of each approach.

    Course ID: 100462
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 480 - Animal Behavior

    (4.00)
    This course explores the general themes and important questions in animal behavior. We cover subjects that examine how and why animals interact with each other and with their environment. Topics include: the genetics of behavior, behavioral development, learning, animal communication, habitat selection, foraging, sexual selection, and mating systems, among others. This is a quantitative course; a familiarity with basic statistics and mathematics is assumed.  Note:This course is Writing Intensive.

    Course ID: 100498
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 142  and BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  and ENGL 100  or equivalent with a C or better.
  
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    BIOL 481 - Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Biology

    (4.00)
    This advanced course analyzes principles of and current topics in evolutionary biology. The study of evolution informs every facet of biological inquiry and every level of biological organization, from molecules to ecosystems.Topics will vary across semesters according to current research and the interests of faculty. Representative topics may include the origin of species, natural and sexual selection, neutral theory, comparative methods, and evolutionary ecology. The course is a mix of lectures, problem-based learning, and student-led presentations of primary research literature. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits or 2 attempts if different topics are covered.

    Course ID: 102010
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Same as Offered: BIOL 681
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 142  and BIOL 302  and BIOL 303   with a grade of "C" or better.
  
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    BIOL 483 - Evolution: From Genes to Genomes

    (4.00)
    This is a combined lecture and hands-on computing course that study the applications of evolutionary theory to the exploration and analysis of phenotypic and biological sequence data. We will begin by building a sound conceptual basis for the theory of evolution, including an introduction to population genetics and phylogenetics. The course consists of one hour lecture, one hour group discussion of current papers in evolution and a two hour computer lab per week. Biological sequence data is analyzed in the computer laboratories to illustrate evolutionary principles and provide practice for data analysis and interpretation. Students will be required to write a review of the literature on a topic in evolution related to their own interests and give presentations on their topic during the last half of the semester.  Note:This course is Writing Intensive.

    Course ID: 52567
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group:  You must have completed BIOL 142  and BIOL 302   and BIOL 303  and STAT 350   or STAT 355   and ENGL 100  or equivalent with a grade of 'C' or better. 
  
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    BIOL 486 - Genome Science

    (4.00)
    Life science at the whole genome level represents a rapidly expanding new paradigm that defines a new field, genome science. BIOL 486 provides students with the requisites for understanding genome science and includes experimental basics of functional genomics and analytical basics of bioinformatics. Biomedical and agricultural research are developing the potential of genome science, in both the public and private sectors. Important questions that have been unapproachable are now thought to be within reach. For example, students in BIOL 486 will learn how genome science may provide tools to unravel the arcane genetics of complex diseases and traits. Information sources will include textbook(s), primary literature and computer methods.

    Course ID: 52570
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete STAT 350  or STAT 355  and  BIOL 302  and BIOL 303  and CHEM 351  with a grade of 'C' or better.
  
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    BIOL 487 - Medical Case Studies

    (4.00)
    In this course, students integrate their knowledge of physics, chemistry, mathematics, and biology to work on complex medical case studies. Working in teams, students apply information they know, seek out new information, hear from experts in each case, and write up their conclusions about each case. At the end of the course, teams will design and present novel case studies of their own.

    Course ID: 102397
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 303  and CHEM 351  and (PHYS 112  or PHYS 122  ) and (MATH 151  or MATH 155  ) all with a "C" or better.
  
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    BIOL 490 - Chemical Communication and Brain Disorders

    (4.00)
    This course will allow students to develop an understanding of how neurons in the nervous system communicate using synapses, neurotransmitters, and neuroactive compounds. In the context of brain disorders and their resultant defects in chemical communications, students will gain an appreciation for how neurons and neural networks react to internal and external stimuli and how their activity underlies brain function.

    Course ID: 102329
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Prerequisite: You must complete BIOL 303  and eitherBIOL 305  orBIOL 307  with a C or better.
  
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    BIOL 495 - Seminar in Bioinformatics

    ( 4.00)
    A "capstone" seminar course for students in the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Program. Students will be introduced to examples of the integrated uses of the various disciplines that together comprise bioinformatics and computational biology.

    Course ID: 52574
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 303  and BIOL 313  and BIOL 430 ; and CMSC 341  with a grade of 'C' or better. CMSC 341  can be taken concurrently.
  
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    BIOL 497H - Honors Capstone course

    (3.00)
    Students who are pursuing departmental honors will write and submit a scholarly paper reporting on the outcome of their senior research project, and will present their research either orally or as a poster, at one or more public forums, as decided by the Departmental Honors committee. Students will also be expected to attend at least 12 departmental seminars and prepare at least 6 one page abstracts of these seminars. This course is repeatable for credit.

    Course ID: 52575
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have been admitted to the Honors College to take this course.
  
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    BIOL 499 - Undergraduate Laboratory/Field Research

    (1.00 - 4.00)
    BIOL students (BS only) may use independent research in the laboratory of a faculty member as a substitute for one of the upper level laboratory classes required by the major. To do so, students must register for BIOL 499 for two semesters in a row. In the second semester they must also register for this course, BIOL 499L, in which they will give oral presentations and write a final paper about their research project. 

    Course ID: 52576
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Independent Study
    Course Equivalents: BIOL 499H  
    Instructor consent required.  "Repeatable" needs to be changed from Yes to No
  
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    BIOL 499H - Undergraduate Laboratory/Field Research-Honors

    (1.00 - 6.00)
    Original laboratory or field research for students in the Biological Sciences Honors Program to be conducted under the supervision of an UMBC faculty member. Variable credit course is repeatable.

    Course ID: 52577
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Independent Study
    Course Equivalents: BIOL 499  
  
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    BIOL 499L - Undergraduate Research Seminar

    (1.00)
    BIOL students (BS only) may use independent research in the laboratory of a faculty member as a substitute for one of the upper level laboratory classes required by the major. To do so, students must register for BIOL 499   for two semesters in a row. In the second semester they must also register for this course,BIOL 499L , in which they will give oral presentations and write a final paper about their research project. Recommended Course Preparation:BIOL 300L  

    Course ID: 100637
    Consent: Instructor Consent Required
    Components: Independent Study
    Attributes: Attributes: Writing Intensive

Chemical Engineering

  
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    ENCH 210 - Introduction to Environmental Engineering

    (3.00)
    This course will provide an introduction to environmental quality and the development of the background necessary for understanding environmental engineering principles and problem solving. Flow and material balance concepts will be presented for tracking substances in the environment and in engineered systems. Simple quantitative engineering models will be developed describing the fate and transport of chemicals in reactors.

    Course ID: 100566
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete ENES 101  and CHEM 102  and MATH 152 .
  
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    ENCH 215 - Chemical Engineering Analysis

    (3.00)
    Introduction to methods of chemical engineering calculations and analysis. Stoichiometric relations; material and energy balances; and behavior of gases, vapors, liquids and solids. Analytical and computer methods are presented. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 53823
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Course Equivalents: ENCH 215H 
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENES 101  or ENES 101H  or ENES 101Y  and CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  with a C or better in both. Can be taken concurrently.
  
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    ENCH 215H - Chemical Engineering Analysis-Honors

    (3.00)
    Course ID: 53824
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Course Equivalents: ENCH 215 
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College and have completed ENES 101  or ENES 101H  or ENES 101Y  and CHEM 102  or ENES102H with a grade of C or better. Can be taken concurrently.
  
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    ENCH 225L - Chemical Engineering Problem Solving and Experiment Design Lab

    (4.00)
    Introduction to the scientific method as applied to chemical engineering processes associated with thermodynamics and fluid, heat and mass transport. Computational and experimental tools are introduced. Students will formulate hypotheses to test physical phenomena associated with chemical engineering processes, design experiments based on their hypotheses, perform experiments, and use appropriate computational and programming tools as well as statistical methods to analyze their data and its significance. Issues of safety and ethics, as applied to chemical engineering, also will be discussed.

    Course ID: 53825
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed ENCH 215  or ENCH 215H  and ENGL 100  with a grade of C or better.
  
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    ENCH 300 - Chemical Process Thermodynamics

    (3.00)
    Principles of thermodynamics and their application to engineering problems. First and second laws of thermodynamics; properties of gases; liquids and solids; phase equilibrium; flow and non-flow systems; energy conversion; production of work from heat; thermodynamic analysis of processes; equilibrium-stage operations and the thermodynamics of chemically reacting systems. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 53828
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 215  and MATH 251  and CHEM 351  with a "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 333 - Chemical Engineering Seminar

    (1.00)
    Oral and written reports on recent developments in chemical engineering and the process industries.

    Course ID: 53829
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
  
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    ENCH 410 - Environmental Chemistry

    (3.00)
    This course presents chemical and biological principles in the context of manmade and natural systems. Equilibrium and kinetic concepts are reinforced through the use of chemical equilibrium and kinetic models. Surface and colloid chemistry are also discussed. At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the basic chemical and biological phenomena that control the fate of pollutants in the environment. Recommended Preparation: ENCH 210 . This course is repeatable for credit up to 6 credits or 2 attempts

    Course ID: 100567
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 102  and MATH 225  and take ENCH 300  as a corequisite.
  
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    ENCH 412 - Environmental Physicochemical Processes

    (3.00)
    This course focuses on physicochemical processes that control the fate of contaminants in engineered and natural systems is discussed. Physicochemical phenomenon is first introduced from a phenomenal standpoint, then its role in both engineered and natural systems discussed. At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the basic physicochemical phenomena that control the fate of pollutants in the environment. Recommended Course Preparation: ENCH 410 .

    Course ID: 100568
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must be concurrently enrolled in ENCH 427 .
  
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    ENCH 414 - Environmental Biological Processes

    (3.00)
    The purpose of this course is to provide students with the fundamental and design aspects of biological processes. The course focuses on engineered biological treatment for both municipal wastewater systems and contaminated soils and sediments. An understanding of biological treatment operations requires knowledge in the fundamental areas of biochemistry, mass transport, microbiology, reaction kinetics and reactor engineering. Recommended Course Preparation: ENCH 410 .

    Course ID: 100569
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 425 - Transport I: Fluids

    (3.00)
    Fluid properties, fluid statics, flow concepts and basic equations, and viscous effects. Applications in measurements of flow. Design of fluid flow equipment. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 53830
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 215  and MATH 225  with a "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 427 - Transport Processes II: Mass Transfer

    (3.00)
    Steady and unsteady state heat and mass transfer, interphase transfer, simultaneous heat and mass transfer, boundary layer theory, and mass transfer with a chemical reaction. Design applications in condensation, heat exchanger, evaporating, and mass transfer operations. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 53831
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 425  with a grade of "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 437L - Chemical Engineering Laboratory

    (3.00)
    Application of chemical engineering process and unit operation principles in small-scale, semi-commercial equipment. Data from experimental observations are used to evaluate performance and efficiency of operations. Emphasis is placed on correct presentation of results in both written and oral form.

    Course ID: 53832
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Laboratory
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must complete ENCH 225L  and ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a grade of C or better.
  
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    ENCH 440 - Chemical Engineering Kinetics

    (3.00)
    Fundamentals of chemical reaction kinetics and their application to the design and operation of chemical reactors. Reaction rate theory, homogeneous reactions in batch and flow systems, heterogeneous reactions and catalysis, and biochemical reactions. Catalytic reactor design. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 53833
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 300  and ENCH 425  and CHEM 301  with a "C" or better. CHEM 303  can be taken concurrently.
  
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    ENCH 442 - Chemical Process Control and Safety

    (3.00)
    Dynamic response of process systems. Analysis, optimization, and design of simple control systems, closed-loop response, and dynamic testing. Design and simulation of systems for chemical process safety.

    Course ID: 53835
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete ENCH 225L  and ENCH 300  and ENCH 425  and MATH 225  all with a grade of C or better.
  
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    ENCH 444 - Process Engineering Economics and Design

    (3.00)
    Principles of chemical engineering economics and process design. Emphasis on equipment types, equipment design principles, capital cost estimation, operating costs and profitability. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 53836
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Student must complete ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a grade of C or better. ENCH 445  can be taken concurrently as a co-requisite.
  
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    ENCH 445 - Separation Processes

    (3.00)
    Solution thermodynamics. Phase equilibrium. Characteristics of separation processes. Simple and multistage equilibrium processes. Design and operation of binary and multicomponent separation processes. Computational approaches. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 53837
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  with a grade of "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 446 - Process Engineering Economics and Design II.

    (4.00)
    Application of chemical engineering principles for the design of chemical processing equipment. Typical problems in the design of chemical plants. Comprehensive reports are required. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 53838
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete ENCH 444  and ENCH 445  and ENCH 442  with a grade of C or better. ENCH 442  may be taken concurrently.
  
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    ENCH 450 - Chemical Process Development

    (3.00)
    Chemical process industries from the standpoint of technology, raw materials, products and processing equipment. Operation of major chemical processes and industries, combined with quantitative analysis of process requirements and yields. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 53839
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 456 - Polymeric Materials

    (3.00)
    The basic elements of the chemistry, physics, processing methods and engineering applications of polymers.

    Course ID: 53843
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
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    ENCH 459 - Statistical Design of Experiments

    (3.00)
    Introduces students to a variety of methods that use a statistical approach in the design, execution and analysis of industrial experiments.

    Course ID: 53845
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 468 - Research Projects

    (1.00 - 3.00)
    Investigation of a research project under the direction of one of the faculty members. Comprehensive reports are required. This course is repeatable a maximum of 6 credits.

    Course ID: 53846
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Research
    Attributes: Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 470 - Chemical and Environmental Modeling

    (3.00)
    This course builds upon mathematical and computational fundamentals from differential equations and chemical engineering problem solving to employ models that simulate chemical and ecological phenomena. Population models for bioreactors and ecosystems will be investigated, as well as mathematical models for simulating water and air chemistry and pollution. Recommended Course Preparation: ENCH 225L  or equivalent programming experience.

    Course ID: 101787
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 472 - Environmental Fate and Transport

    (3.00)
    This course covers basic principles of chemical fate and transport in the environment. Course materials include the fundamental concepts and practical, quantitative problem-solving techniques dealing with environmental contaminations. Mass balance; chemical equilibrium and kinetics; environmental transport; and advanced topics, such as groundwater well dynamics and subsurface fate and transport, atmospheric transport of pollutants and Monod kinetics are among those included in the materials. Computer software is also used to solve complex but practical fate and transport problems in the environment.

    Course ID: 100570
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 474 - Air Pollution

    (3.00)
    The objective of this course will be to provide an introduction to the sources, chemistry and fate of airborne pollutants. In general, it will be broken into three parts: sources and dispersion processes, gas-phase chemistry and particulate-phase chemistry. The focus will be on the urban atmosphere, but as some pollutants have impacts well beyond their source region some discussion of global cycles will be appropriate. The course should provide a general introduction to atmospheric chemistry including both gas-phase and particulate-phase processes.

    Course ID: 100571
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 476 - Environmental Risk Assessment & Remediation

    (3.00)
    The objective of this course is to examine the fundamental principles governing toxic contaminant exposure and risk to humans and ecosystems. The course covers necessary aspects of probability and statistics, physical and chemical behavior of key priority pollutants, mass transfer and exposure pathways of the contaminants, human and environmental toxicology and methodologies for risk assessment. Concepts of green engineering focused on design, commercialization, and use of processes and products to reduce generation of pollution and risk to human health and the environment are studied. Case studies of remediation technology applications with a focus on understanding how human and environmental risk is managed in a real-life situation are presented.

    Course ID: 100572
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 482 - Biochemical Engineering

    (3.00)
    Introduction to biochemical, microbiological and physical phenomena relevant in the bioprocess industry: basic biochemistry, enzyme and cell growth kinetics, modern biological techniques (e.g., DNA sequencing, microarray analysis, proteomics) and topics related to industrial fermentation (e.g., operating modes, mixing, mass transfer, scaleup). When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 53847
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 484 - Biomedical Engineering

    (3.00)
    Applications of engineering analysis to biomedical issues, including drug delivery, biomaterials, tissue engineering, receptor-mediated processes, cardiovascular mechanics, physiological mass transfer and biomedical device design.

    Course ID: 53848
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 485L - Biochemical Engineering Laboratory.

    (4.00)
    Conduct experiments to study microbial growth and product formation kinetics. Study enzyme kinetics. Conduct protein isolation, purification and concentration experiments. Analyze experimental data and prepare written reports and oral presentations. Observe laboratory safety precautions. This course is designed to teach modern chemical and biochemical laboratory practice. Students will learn aspects of heat and mass transfer of relevance to the bioprocess industry. In addition, they will learn aspects of microbial growth and product formation kinetics. Simple cloning techniques and enzyme/antibody assays will be introduced. Students will isolate and purify proteins. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 53849
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Laboratory
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must complete ENCH 225L  and ENCH 482  with a grade of C or better
  
  •  

    ENCH 486 - A Survey of Sensors and Instrumentation

    (3.00)
    This course will provide a broad overview of sensors and instrumentation used in a number of applications. Starting with basic definitions, the course will move on to various principles (physical, chemical and biological) used to sense a variety of parameters. A simple sensor will be contructed during the course to provide hands-on experience in sensor design. This elective is suitable for science and engineering majors.

    Course ID: 53850
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: Must have completed ENCH 427  and ENCH 440  with a "C" or better.
  
  •  

    ENCH 489 - Special Topics in Environmental Engineering

    (3.00)
    Course ID: 53851
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Topics: Envirn Fate Transport, Spec Topics In Envr Engr, Biological Treat Process, Physiochemical Processes, Eng. Env. Processes, Eng. Biological Processes, Environmental Biological Processes, Environmental Chemistry, Air Pollution

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHEM 100 - The Chemical World

    (3.00)
    A topical discussion of the science of chemistry and its relationship to our everyday lives. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, this course does involve the use of chemical formulas and such basic math as algebra and scientific notation. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 52670
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
  
  •  

    CHEM 101 - Principles of Chemistry I

    (4.00)


    An introduction to chemistry for science majors and other students who require a thorough grounding in the principles of chemistry. Topics treated include the atomic-molecular theory of matter, stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical nomenclature, energetics of chemical and physical processes, solutions, periodic properties, VSEPR, molecular orbital theory and chemistry of familiar elements. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both CHEM 101 and CHEM 123 .

    This course may be subject to a Course Materials Charge. The charge may vary by semester, depending on the course materials required. The Course Materials Initiative (CMI) was established to provide students with more affordable course materials, enhance the students' experience on a common digital platform via Blackboard, and position UMBC to be ahead of the curve with digital content. More information is available at UMBC Bookstore's website.

    Course ID: 52671
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Course Equivalents: CHEM 101H
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science
    Requirement Group: You must complete MATH 106 or MATH106Y or MATH150 or MATH151 or MATH155 with a C or better or have AP credit for MATH150 or MATH151 or have a MATH placement score of 4 or 5.

  
  •  

    CHEM 101H - Principles of Chemistry I - Honors

    (4.00)
    This course may be subject to a Course Materials Charge. The charge may vary by semester, depending on the course materials required. The Course Materials Initiative (CMI) was established to provide students with more affordable course materials, enhance the students' experience on a common digital platform via Blackboard, and position UMBC to be ahead of the curve with digital content. More information is available at UMBC Bookstore's website.

    Course ID: 52672
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture, Seminar
    Course Equivalents: CHEM 101  
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
    Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.
  
  •  

    CHEM 102 - Principles of Chemistry II

    (4.00)
    Principles of chemical and physical equilibrium, liquids and solids, elementary thermodynamics, electron and proton transfer reactions, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and a further study of the periodic properties of the elements. When Offered: (Fall/Spring/Summer)

    Course ID: 52673
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture
    Course Equivalents: CHEM 102H 
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 101  or CHEM 101H  with a grade of "C" or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 102H - Principles of Chemistry - Honors

    (4.00)
    Course ID: 52674
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Discussion, Lecture, Seminar
    Course Equivalents: CHEM 102  
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 101  or CHEM 101H  with a grade of "C" or better and also be admitted to the Honors College.
  
  •  

    CHEM 102L - Introductory Chemistry Lab I

    (2.00)
    Companion course to CHEM 102 , intended for all students who require two or more years of chemistry. When Offered: (Fall/Spring/Summer)

    Course ID: 52675
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 101  or CHEM 101H  and CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  all with a C or better. CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  can be completed or taken concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 110L - Scientific Glass Blowing Lab

    (1.00)
    Course ID: 52679
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory
  
  •  

    CHEM 123 - Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry I

    (4.00)
    A two-semester chemistry course intended for students preparing for health sciences. Topics include atomicmolecular theory, properties of the elements, bonding and molecular structure, solutions, elementary organic chemistry, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. When Offered: (Fall/Summer) Recommended Preparation: A working knowledge of elementary algebra is required

    Course ID: 52682
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
  
  •  

    CHEM 124 - Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry II

    (3.00)
    Continuation of CHEM 123 . When Offered: (Spring/Summer)

    Course ID: 52683
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 123  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 124L - General Organic and Biochemistry Lab

    (2.00)
    A companion laboratory course to CHEM 124 . This course, together with CHEM 123  and CHEM 124 , will complete the chemistry requirement for nurses, dental hygienists, physical therapists and others in health-related sciences, with the exception of premed and predental students. When Offered: (Spring/Summer)

    Course ID: 52684
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 123  and CHEM 124  both with a C or better. CHEM 124  can be taken concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 299 - Training in Experimental Chemistry (Cooperative Education)

    (1.00 - 3.00)
    This course cannot be applied to the requirements of the major in chemistry. It does, however, provide a mechanism whereby a student intending to pursue a career in chemistry may acquire academic credit for training obtained while employed outside of the university. The number of credits assigned, which may not exceed three per semester, is based upon the instructor's assessment of the scientific level of the employment and its contribution to the professional development of the student. The grade assigned is based upon a report written by the student and the instructor's appraisal of the student's performance. Variable credit course repeatable up to 6 credits.

    Course ID: 52688
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Independent Study
  
  •  

    CHEM 300 - Analytical Chemistry

    (4.00)
    A lecture-laboratory course covering the theory and practice of quantitative chemical analysis. The emphasis is on homogeneous and heterogeneous equibilibria involved in gravimetric and volumetric methods. Introduction to instrumental techniques includes potentiometry, spectrophotometry and chromatographic separations. When Offered: (Fall/Spring)

    Course ID: 52689
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  and CHEM 102L  with a grade of "C" or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 301 - Physical Chemistry I

    (4.00)
    A lecture course covering the laws of thermodynamics, with emphasis on their application to chemical systems. Topics considered include thermochemistry, equations of state, physical and chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and the theory of rate processes. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 52690
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  and MATH 152  or MATH 152H  and PHYS 122  all with a C or better. PHYS 122  can also be taken concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 302 - Physical Chemistry II

    (3.00)
    Continuation of CHEM 301 . Topics considered include molecular structure and bonding, interpretation of spectra, and introductory quantum and statistical mechanics. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 52691
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 301  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 303 - Physical Chemistry for the Biochemical Sciences

    (3.00)
    This course is designed to familiarize students with the qualitative and quantitative concepts of physical chemistry as they apply to biochemical systems and macromolecules. Approximately one-third of the course will be devoted to topics in thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopy. Topics considered include general equilibrium thermodynamics emphasizing biochemical applications, ligand binding, biological oxidation-reduction reactions, membranes, colligative properties and transport properties, kinetics including elementary rate laws, reaction mechanisms and activated processes, and relaxation and enzyme kinetics, and an introduction to quantum chemistry, electronic structure and bonding, and molecular spectroscopy (including vibrational, electronic and magnetic spectroscopy). The use of modern instrumentation will be discussed throughout the course. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 52692
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 351  and MATH 152  with a C or better. PHYS 112  or PHYS 122  must be completed with a C or better and can be taken concurrently
  
  •  

    CHEM 311L - Advanced Laboratory I

    (3.00)
    Laboratory exercises encompassing experimental problems in physical, inorganic, synthetic and instrumental analytical chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of data, the techniques of measurement and computerinterfaced instrumentation. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 52695
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 102L  with a C or better and have completed CHEM 301   with a 'C' or better or be enrolled in CHEM 301   concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 312L - Advanced Laboratory II

    (3.00)
    Continuation of CHEM 311L . When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 52696
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 311L  and CHEM 302  both with a C or better. You can also take CHEM 302  concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 351 - Organic Chemistry I

    (3.00)
    The chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, including bonding, stereochemistry and reactions of functional groups. Reaction mechanisms, synthetic methods and characterization of organic molecules. When Offered: Fall/Spring

    Course ID: 52697
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 351L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

    (2.00)
    Companion laboratory course to CHEM 351 . When Offered: (Fall/Spring)

    Course ID: 52698
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  and CHEM 102L  and CHEM 351  all with a C or better. CHEM 351  can be taken concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 352 - Organic Chemistry II

    (3.00)
    Continuation of CHEM 351 . When Offered: (Spring/Summer)

    Course ID: 52699
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 102  or CHEM 102H  and CHEM 351  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 352L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

    (2.00)
    Companion laboratory class to CHEM 352  and continuation of CHEM 351L . When Offered: (Spring/Summer)

    Course ID: 52700
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 102L  and CHEM 351  and CHEM 351L  and CHEM 352  all with a C or better. CHEM 352  can be taken concurrently.
  
  •  

    CHEM 396 - Undergraduate Learning Assistantship

    (1.00-300)
    This service-learning course is designed for undergraduate learning assistants in non-laboratory chemistry courses. Students must be recommended in writing by the faculty member teaching the course and be approved by the department. Student work must be performed in a course taught by the Chemistry and Biochemistry department and must have a significant learning component. In addition to their classroom responsibilities, students will participate in a weekly session on effective learning methods and pedagogy taught by a member of the chemistry faculty. P/F grading only, credit will be earned for the mandatory weekly session and for the preparation for and interaction with students in the classroom. A maximum of eight credits of CHEM 396 is allowed. Permission of the instructor is required. Recommended Preparation: A grade of B or higher in the course that they will serve as a Learning Assistant.

    Course ID: 102073
    Consent: Instructor Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
  
  •  

    CHEM 397 - Ethics and Integrity in Scientific Research

    (1.00)
    Individuals involved in contemporary scientific research have ethical responsibilities for their conduct. The goal of this course is to provide studentsconsidering a career in scientific research with an appropriate framework for establishing appropriate scientific integrity. Various topics relevant to scientific integrity, including defining, handling and responding to fraud and misconduct; peer review; obligations and rights of students and mentors; ethical conduct in animal and human experimentation; ownership of data; reagents; and intellectual property, authorship and conflict of interest will be presented and discussed. Specific research situations and examples of past ethical violations will be used to illustrate appropriate ethical standards.

    Course ID: 52701
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
  
  •  

    CHEM 398 - Seminar in Chemistry

    (2.00)
    In this course, the problem of lead poisoning will serve as a focal point to develop perspective, insight and retrospection into an important societal problem. The course will be presented as a series of seminars that cover in-depth the many facets of lead and lead poisoning. Some of the topics include the chemistry of lead, its history, toxicology, ecology, legal and political ramifications, and its remediation. The culmination of the course will be the student projects, which will meld their knowledge, interpretation of lecture material and personal experience.

    Course ID: 52702
    Consent: Department Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
  
  •  

    CHEM 399 - Tutorial Projects in Chemistry

    (1.00 - 3.00)
    Independent study supervised by a faculty member. The course is intended for students who wish to study topics in chemistry not covered by the regular course offerings. One credit hour is equal to a minimum of four hours of work in the laboratory per week. Chem 399 may be taken for a maximum of 3 credits and may only be taken once. A maximum of eight credits from the combination of BIOL 398 , BIOL 399 , BIOL 499 , CHEM 399 and CHEM 499  may be applied toward the 120 credits for graduation. Variable credit course repeatable up to 6 credits.

    Course ID: 52703
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Independent Study
  
  •  

    CHEM 401 - Chemical and Statistical Thermodynamics

    (3.00)
    Basic methods of classical and statistical thermodynamics developed at a level appropriate for first-year graduate students and advanced undergraduates. When Offered: (Spring)

    Course ID: 52704
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 302  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 405 - Inorganic Chemistry

    (3.00)
    Basic theoretical concepts of inorganic chemistry, including a study of the periodic table, the elements and their physical and chemical properties. Several theories of bonding are discussed, as well as the mechanisms of inorganic reactions, coordination chemistry and the chemistry of transition metals. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 52705
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352  and CHEM 301  or CHEM 303  all with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 405L - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab

    (3.00)
    The course skills that will be emphasized in the course are anaerobic synthesis and advanced characterization methods. These methods will be applied to inorganic complexes important in biological/medicinal inorganic chemistry and nanomaterials. This interdisciplinary course aims to combine traditional inorganic chemistry concepts/methods with areas of inorganic chemistry not covered in lower-level courses.

    Course ID: 100099
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 300  and CHEM 352L  and CHEM 405  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 406 - Bioinorganic Chemistry

    (3.00)
    Intended for senior-level undergraduates and graduate students, this course focuses on the role and function of metals in biology. Topics include metalloenzyme mechanisms, spectroscopy and use of metals in medicine. Recommended Preparation: CHEM 405  or CHEM 437 

    Course ID: 52706
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 405  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 410 - Quantum Chemistry

    (3.00)
    Introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics and their application to chemical systems. Topics include the postulatory basis of quantum mechanics; approximate methods; vibrational, rotational, electronic, nuclear magnetic and electron spin spectroscopy; atomic structure; the chemical bond, valence bond; and molecular orbital theory.

    Course ID: 52707
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 302  or CHEM 303  w/ a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 415 - Statistical Mechanics and Theory of Rate Processes

    (3.00)
    Introduction to statistical mechanics and theoretical aspects of absolute reaction rate theory. Major topics include statistical definition of entropy; compounding of systems; combinational problems; the methods of Gibbs; quantum statistics; partition functions; applications to equilibrium states of gases, solids and liquids; and partition formulation of the theory of absolute reaction rates.

    Course ID: 52709
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 302  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 420 - Computer Applications in Chemistry

    (3.00)
    The course is designed to help develop an appreciation and understanding of how to write a computer program to solve problems related to chemical research. Fundamentals of electronic chemical structure calculations. This is not a theory course, but a practical course in which programming techniques, data handling, and online computational tools are discussed. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 52710
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 302  or CHEM 303  with a C or better.
  
  •  

    CHEM 431 - Chemistry of Proteins

    (3.00)
    An advanced treatment of the chemistry of proteins and protein-containing supramolecular structures. The topics include isolation and purification of proteins, structure of proteins and relation of structure to biological function.

    Course ID: 52713
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437  with a C or better
  
  •  

    CHEM 432 - Advanced Biochemistry

    (3.00)
    The topics presented would not normally be covered in any other biochemistry course and may include an advanced treatment of enzyme kinetics with emphasis upon two-substrate systems, allosteric control mechanisms, replication and transcription, and the biochemistry of specialized tissues. This course is repeatable for credit.

    Course ID: 52714
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Topics: Advanced Biochemistry, Molecular Recog., Adv Bioc:Post-Trans Reg, Adv Bioc:Allosteric Prot, Molec Recognition
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437  and CHEM 438  with a C or better
  
  •  

    CHEM 433 - Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids

    (3.00)
    A survey of nucleic acid structure and function, with emphasis on chemical aspects. Topics will include DNA and RNA structure, packaging of nucleic acids, chemical and physical properties of nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes of DNA replication, fidelity of nucleic acid synthesis, biochemistry of DNA recombination, enzymology of transcription and RNA processing.

    Course ID: 52715
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437  with a C or better
  
  •  

    CHEM 435 - Biochemistry of Complex Carbohydrates

    (3.00)
    Structure and function of the carbohydrates of glycoprotiens, glycolipids, proteoglycans and bacterial polysaccharides; carbohydrates as informational macromolecules; decoding by lectins; biosynthesis; structure; engineering of glycoproteins; bacterial adhesion; and virulence and tumor antigens.

    Course ID: 52717
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437  with a C or better
  
  •  

    CHEM 437 - Comprehensive Biochemistry I

    (4.00)
    The first semester of a two semester sequence providing a thorough introduction to the principles of modern biochemistry. Major topics include enzyme kinetics and the structures and properties of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. When Offered: (Fall)

    Course ID: 52718
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352  with a grade of C or better
  
  •  

    CHEM 437L - Biochemistry Laboratory

    (4.00)
    Modern methods of biochemical research. Laboratory experiments are designed to provide experience in working with biologically active materials and familiarity with standard biochemical techniques. These include spectrophotometry; chromatography; isotope tracer techniques; ultra-centrifugation; enzyme kinetics; and isolation, purification and characterization of proteins, nucleic acids and subcellular organelles. Two laboratory sessions per week.

    Course ID: 52719
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Laboratory, Lecture
    Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM351L and CHEM300 with a C or better. Corequisite :CHEM437 and consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    CHEM 438 - Comprehensive Biochemistry II

    (4.00)
    Continuation of CHEM 437 . Includes metabolic pathways and selected topics in nucleic acid and membrane chemistry. When Offered: (spring)

    Course ID: 52720
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437  with a C or better
  
  •  

    CHEM 441 - Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules

    (3.00)
    Introduction to the physical chemistry of macromolecules. Emphasis is placed on the development of broad general concepts applicable to the study of synthetic and biological macromolecules. Topics considered include determination of molecular weight and molecular weight distributions; conformational properties of high polymers; and thermodynamics and transport properties of polymer solutions, polyelectrolytes and polymerization processes. Techniques such as sedimentation analysis, light scattering, osmometry and viscometry are discussed.

    Course ID: 52721
    Consent: No Special Consent Required
    Components: Lecture
    Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM 301  with a C or better.
 

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