Dec 08, 2019  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Mathematics and Statistics


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Faculty

Chair

Rouben Rostamian
B.S., Arya-Mehr University (Iran), 1972; Ph.D., Brown University, 1977

Professors

Thomas E. Armstrong
B.S., University of Minnesota, 1967; M.A., Princeton University, 1969; Ph.D., 1973

Matthias K. Gobbert
B.Sc., Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany), 1990, M.N.S., Arizona State University, 1993; Ph.D., 1996

M.S. Gowda
B.Sc., Bangalore University, 1969; M.Sc., 1971; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1980; Ph.D., 1982

Osman Guler
B.A., Yale University, 1978; S.M., The University of Chicago, 1979; Ph.D., 1990

Kathleen Hoffman
B.S., University of New Hampshire, 1991; Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park, 1997

Jacob Kogan
B.S., Tel Aviv University, 1976; M.S., Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel), 1980; Ph.D., 1985

James T. Lo
B.S., National Taiwan University, 1964; Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1969

Thomas Mathew
B.A., University of Kerala (India), 1976; M.A., 1978; Ph.D., Indian Statistical Institute, 1984

Florian Potra
B.S., Babes-Bolyai University (Romania), 1973; MS, 1974; Ph.D., University of Bucharest, 1980

Muruhan Rathinam
B.E., University of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), 1987; Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, 1997

Anindya Roy
B.S., Indian Statistical Institute (Calcutta, India), 1991; M.S., 1993; Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1999

Bimal K. Sinha
B.Sc., University of Calcutta (India), 1965; M.Sc., University of Calcutta (India), 1967; Ph.D., University of Calcutta (India), 1973

Manil Suri
B.S., University of Bombay (India), 1979; M.S., Carnegie Mellon University, 1980; Ph.D., 1983

Associate Professors

Kofi Adragni
B.S. Universite de Lome, Lome Togo, 1996; M.S. University of Minnesota, 2006; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2009

Andrei Draganescu
B.Sc., University of Bucharest (Romania), 1993; S.M., The University of Chicago, 1997; Ph.D., 2004

Yi Huang
B.S., Peking University (China), 1997; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles, 2000; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, 2007

Weining Kang
B.S., Nankai University (China), 1998; PhD.. University of California, San Diego, 2005

Yaakov Malinovsky
B.A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1999; M.A., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 2002; Ph.D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 2009

Do-Hwan Park
B.S., Ehwa Womens University, 1999; Ph.D., University of Missouri, Columbia, 2005

Junyong Park
B.S., Seoul National University (Korea), 1995; M.S., 1997; M.S., Purdue University, 2003; Ph.D., 2006

Bradford E. Peercy
B.S., Trinity University, 1995; M.S., University of Utah, 1997; Ph.D. 2003

Jinglai Shen
B.S.E., Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (China), 1994; M.S.E., 1997; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2002

Assistant Professors

Hye-Won Kang
B.S. Yonsei University (S. Korea), Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 2008

Bedrich Sousedik
Ph.D., Czech. Technological University in Prague, 2008, Ph.D., University of Colorado, 2010

Justin T. Webster
B.A., University of San Diego, 2008, M.S., University of Virginia, 2010; Ph.D., 2012

Senior Lecturer

Rajalakshmi Baradwaj
B.Sc., University of Madras (India), 1984; M.Sc., 1987; M.S., Texas A&M University, 1990

Elizabeth Stanwyck
B.S., Georgia State University, 2005; M.S. University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 2007; Ph.D., 2011

Bonny Tighe
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, 1970

Lecturers

Brian Dean
B.S., University of Notre Dame, 1999; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 2002; Ph.D., 2004

Kalman Nanes
B.S., University of Michigan, 2003; Ph.D. Northwestern University, 2009

Emeritus

Jonathan Bell
B.S., San Diego State University, 1969; M.S., 1971; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1977

Nam P. Bhatia
B.Sc., B.R. College (India), 1952; M.Sc., Agra College, 1954; M.Sc., B.R. College, 1956; Dr. rer. nat., Technische Hoschschule, Dresden (Germany), 1961

Fred Gross
B.S., Brooklyn College, 1955; M.S., Columbia University, 1957; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1962

Arthur O. Pittenger
B.S., Stanford University, 1958; M.S., 1959; Ph.D., 1967

Andrew Rukhin
B.S., Leningrad State University (Russia), 1967; Ph.D., Steklov Mathematical Institute (Russia), 1970

Thomas I. Seidman
A.B., The University of Chicago, 1952; M.A., Teachers College Columbia University, 1953; M.S., New York University, 1954; Ph.D., 1959

 

Courses in this program are listed under MATH and STAT.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers major programs leading to both the B.A. and B.S. in Mathematics and the B.S. in Statistics. Students in other departments may pursue a minor or a second major in mathematics or statistics. Students in mathematics or statistics may obtain a minor or second major in the other discipline.

The Program in Mathematics

The educational program is designed to give students a broad perspective on various fields of mathematics. Special emphasis is placed on areas closely associated with applications, such as mathematical modeling, differential equations, numerical algorithms and statistical analysis. The university's state-of-the-art computing facilities are available to all students and often are used in conjunction with instruction.

Career and Academic Paths

Through their choice of mathematics and statistics electives, students may tailor their program for a wide variety of career goals. Mathematics and statistics majors are in great demand in the increasingly interdisciplinary world.

UMBC students have used a degree in mathematics or statistics as a launching pad for a wide variety of careers ranging from information technology to pursuing a law degree. Working as a mathematician or statistician in the industry or government, becoming an actuary, secondary school teaching, and pursuing a graduate degree in a subject of their choice are just a few options for a graduate.

Concentration for Graduate Study

This is particularly appropriate for those who wish to pursue advanced studies in mathematics at the graduate level.

Concentration in Applied Mathematics

This is recommended for students who wish to prepare for industrial employment with engineering or physical science applications, immediately after obtaining a baccalaureate degree, either B.S. or B.A. The emphasis in this concentration is applications in which physical phenomena and processes are modeled with differential equations and the numerical solutions of these systems.

Concentration in Optimization and Operations Research

This is recommended for students who wish to prepare for industrial employment as applied mathematicians/ operations researchers. It is also particularly appropriate for those interested in the optimization techniques applicable to economics, management science, engineering and physical sciences.

Concentration in Actuarial Science

This is designed for students who wish to prepare for a career in actuarial mathematics. Courses in this concentration will prepare a student for the first examinations administered by the Society of Actuaries.

Concentration in Mathematics Education

This has been developed in cooperation with the UMBC Department of Education and is specifically designed for students who wish to become certified as secondary school mathematics teachers. Students should consult with an advisor in the Department of Education for specific requirements for certification.

Concentration in Statistical Sciences

This is designed for students who wish to prepare for careers as statisticians or for other careers heavily using probability and statistics. This concentration is appropriate for students who pursue graduate study in statistics.

B.S. in Statistics

The B.S. in Statistics is described following the description of the major in mathematics. Majors in mathematics also may pursue a second major in statistics to obtain greater depth than the concentration in statistical sciences provides. At least five upper-division electives beyond core requirements in mathematics must be mathematics courses if a student is to receive a double major or dual degree in mathematics and statistics.

Academic Advising

After declaration of a major or minor in mathematics, each student will be assigned an advisor from the faculty of the department. Students must consult with their major and minor advisors prior to each registration. This is the case even if a student has another major and minor advisor in that major. Mathematics majors obtaining certification in education should consult advisors in the Department of Education in addition to their advisors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Honors Program

Students may graduate with departmental honors by completing all major requirements with a GPA of 3.6 or higher and by completing, in addition to other requirements for a major in mathematics, a senior thesis (MATH 497  or STAT 497 ) with a grade of "A" or "B." Students wishing to graduate with departmental honors must notify the department by the beginning of their senior year.

Evening and Part-time Options

Most freshman and sophomore courses and some upper-divisional courses are offered concurrently in day and evening sections to accommodate working or commuting students. The courses that are not concurrently offered in day and evening sections are rotated between day and evening sections in regular intervals.

It is possible to complete the program of study entirely on a part-time basis. Naturally, the length of study will depend on the number of courses taken each semester. It is possible to accelerate studies by taking some of the courses in the summer. Each summer, the department offers close to 20 undergraduate courses selected from the regular course catalog.

Special Opportunities

UMBC's proximity to federal agencies in the Baltimore-Washington area provides ample opportunities for internships and cooperative education experiences during the academic year and the summer. A close relationship exists between UMBC faculty and the staff at the National Security Agency (NSA). Many students have served as interns at NSA and have found employment there.

Upon graduation, others have co-oped at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency and BlueCross/ BlueShield.

Student Organizations

Pi Mu Epsilon; National Mathematics Honors Society

Pi Mu Epsilon, the national mathematics honors society, has an active chapter at UMBC and organizes joint activities with the Mathematics and Statistics Council of Majors.

Mu Sigma Rho; National Statistics Honors Society

Mu Sigma Rho is the national honorary society for statistics. Its purpose is the promotion and encouragement of scholarly activity in statistics, and the recognition of outstanding achievement among the students and instructional staff in eligible academic institutions. The alpha chapter of Maryland at UMBC, initiated in 2007, organizes joint activities with the Mathematics and Statistics Council of Majors.

The Program in Statistics

Statistics is the science and art of making inferences from data under conditions of uncertainty. The practice of statistics requires not only an understanding of statistical techniques, but also some understanding of the nuances of the problem requiring statistical analysis - whether it is in the social or physical sciences, engineering, medicine or business.

The major program leading to a B.S. in Statistics, offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, is geared toward the above goal. The educational program is designed to give students a broad perspective on the theory and applications of statistics. In particular, the interdisciplinary curriculum structure of the program helps develop skills in the application of statistical methods to a variety of disciplines. The university's state-ofthe-art computing facilities are available to all students and are used in conjunction with instruction.

UMBC is the only institution in Maryland offering an undergraduate major in statistics. Students from other fields may obtain a minor in statistics.

Career and Academic Paths

The use of statistical methods to address complex problems is pervasive in almost all areas of business, government and science, and this has created a growing demand for statisticians. UMBC's location puts it at the heart of some of the most exciting statistical work in the nation, carried out at the Census Bureau (Suitland, MD), Bureau of Labor Statistics (Washington, D.C.), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Washington, D.C.), National Center for Health Statistics (Hyattsville, MD), the Army Research Laboratory (Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD), National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD), and the Food and Drug Administration (Rockville, MD), along with several other federal agencies, pharmaceutical companies and other industries. The ever-growing demand for statisticians at these places makes our B.S. in Statistics very attractive.

Statisticians working at the U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, etc., are required to work on various applications, including design and analysis of surveys, evaluation of nonsampling errors resulting from non-response and research to reduce these errors.

Statisticians working at pharmaceutical companies are required to be knowledgeable in biostatistics. Our B.S. program (applied statistics track) is tailored toward the needs of federal agencies, pharmaceutical companies and industries in general.

In addition, there is a heavy demand for statisticians who have completed graduate degrees (M.S. or Ph.D.). The mathematical statistics track in the B.S. program prepares students to pursue graduate study in statistics.

Academic Advising

Subsequent to the declaration of a major in statistics, each student will be assigned an advisor from the statistics faculty of the department. Students must consult with their advisor prior to course registration. In addition to keeping track of each student's academic progress through the academic program, the faculty advisor is available to discuss related issues such as career goals, internship opportunities, opportunities for graduate study, etc. The departmental advising process is designed to give each student individual attention and guidance.

Honors Program

Students may graduate with departmental honors by completing all major requirements with a GPA of 3.6 or higher and by completing, in addition to other requirements for a major in statistics, a senior thesis (STAT 497  or MATH 497 ) with a grade of "A" or "B." Students wishing to graduate with departmental honors must notify the department by the beginning of their senior year.

Special Note to Mathematics Majors:

Mathematics majors can satisfy the requirements for a minor in Statistics by making sure to take at least two 400-level courses in Statistics that do not also count toward the Mathematics major.

Special Opportunities

UMBC's proximity to federal agencies, pharmaceutical companies and other industries in the Baltimore-Washington area provides students ample opportunities to gain hands-on experience in applied statistical work through cooperative educational experiences and internships during the academic year and during summer. The department is very proactive in finding internship opportunities for students.

Programs

    Bachelor of ArtsBachelor of ScienceNon-DegreeBachelor of Science/Master of Science

    Courses

      MathematicsStatistics

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